Android Question Goodbye Windows 7? B4A / B4X on a Chrome Book / Chrome Box?

Syd Wright

Active Member
Licensed User
It might be possible but not financially justified, I mean, who in his right mind would spend countless hours 'porting' B4X to a OS that only 4 people uses?
I guess you haven't looked at the latest Chrome Book figures. You'll find that the figure now is around 25%, especially in the USA.
60% of schools in the US use them and in 2018 21% of all sold laptops were Chromebooks (just quoting what I found on Google).

Here in Holland Google is running an aggressive TV advertising campaign against Windows, using scary pictures of Windows PC's that show Blue screens of death, Virus warnings and Ransomware screens. I wouldn't be surprised if Chrome Books and Chrome Boxes with Chrome OS will capture 50% of the market in 2 to 3 years time.

Please read this (or similar articles): https://chromeunboxed.com/chrome-os-chromebooks-future-computing-google/
and: https://techcrunch.com/2020/01/06/intel-and-google-plot-out-closer-collaboration-around-chromebooks-and-the-future-of-computing/
The latter article quotes a 27% market share for Chromebooks in the US in November 2019! Together with Intel, Google intends to push "Project Athena" into the small business and home PC market.

It will be mistake to under-estimate the power of Google to push these products into the market, especially with Google's aim to capture as much market as it can with all the products in its ecosystem. Chrome O.S. devices can already run Android apps including Office-alike apps and a huge number of games. To my impression 90% of the users will be satisfied with what these products have to offer and in the near future mainly/only developers like us will (have to) remain on Windows.

In conclusion, I don't think it is such a bad idea to look ahead at what the market has in stall and to anticipate what implications it can and will have for (us) software developers.

PS: Here is that (very well-made) advert:

 
Last edited:

NJDude

Expert
Licensed User
I guess you haven't looked at the latest Chrome Book figures. You'll find that the figure now is around 25%, especially in the USA.
60% of schools in the US use them and in 2018 21% of all sold laptops were Chromebooks (just quoting what I found on Google).

Here in Holland Google is running an aggressive TV advertising campaign against Windows, using scary pictures of Windows PC's that show Blue screens of death, Virus warnings and Ransomware screens. I wouldn't be surprised if Chrome Books and Chrome Boxes with Chrome OS will capture 50% of the market in 2 to 3 years time.

Please read this (or similar articles): https://chromeunboxed.com/chrome-os-chromebooks-future-computing-google/
and: https://techcrunch.com/2020/01/06/intel-and-google-plot-out-closer-collaboration-around-chromebooks-and-the-future-of-computing/
The latter article quotes a 27% market share for Chromebooks in the US in November 2019! Together with Intel, Google intends to push "Project Athena" into the small business and home PC market.

It will be mistake to under-estimate the power of Google to push these products into the market, especially with Google's aim to capture as much market as it can with all the products in its ecosystem. Chrome O.S. devices can already run Android apps including Office-alike apps and a huge number of games. To my impression 90% of the users will be satisfied with what these products have to offer and in the near future mainly/only developers like us will (have to) remain on Windows.

In conclusion, I don't think it is such a bad idea to look ahead at what the market has in stall and to anticipate what implications it can and will have for (us) software developers.

PS: Here is that (very well-made) advert:

Chrome Books are nothing but a 'hardware' browser and the main targets are home users or 'enthusiasts' who think that 'the cloud' is the future, well, is not.
 

sorex

Expert
Licensed User
Advertisements are alway tricking/luring people as their product is always better than the rest.

As written before we have several of them and of different brands and I wouldn't be able to fill my day with it as I will constantly bump onto thing that I can't do with it.

For managing servers it's ok as you remote control to it anyway but from the moment you want to do things locally it's very limited.
When for example a remote desktop client freezes you can't even close it and need to hard reset the device to be able to continue.

At first the boot time was fast but it degrades aswell just like a smartphone/tablet. I bet that most windows10 pc's here boot faster now.

The idea is nice when you're 100% relying on cloud services like websites,webmail,google drive,web banking.

You could install ubuntu or something on it if you want full freedom and use a virtualized windows 10 pc with incorrect dns/gateway settings
so that you don't pull in updates or other stuff (virusses/ransomware). And only enable it when you need to update the SDK.
But then you also need to switch back and forth (between network setting or linux<>vm) if you want to look something up on the internet.

Indeed, for schools it's ideal. Cheap and easy to centrally manage. And in Belgium most of them use web based services for schoolwork and office365 for mail etc.

But in the IT classes you won't find them.
 
Last edited:

techknight

Well-Known Member
Licensed User
I have a feeling this thread is going to turn into a crapfest, Fast. Probably just best it would be closed, or diverted back on topic.

As far as Windows 10, The Telemetry never bothered me. They installed it with updates in windows 7 as well, it is what it is.

The problem I have with Windows 10 are the little glitches and nuances that I run into. Windows 10 as a Core OS is perfectly fine. With modern hardware, its fast, and works fine without many issues.

However, for me, and warning this is HIGHLY subjective, but doing things like installing other peoples 3rd party patches to fix weird nuances/bugs like "sticky corners" on multi monitor setups is asinine when my mouse gets trapped, something that should have been fixed eons ago. Also, tweaking the start menu with Open shell because the modern design is fugly IMHO, and the ribbonized Explorer windows drive me insane.

Also with microsoft using the AppX service to push/install what they want on my machine at any time is kind of a put-off as well. Sure, Doesnt meant I cant just uninstall it, or not run it (looking at you candy crush). Its just principal.

The other noticeable thing with windows 10 is the added "features" they add during each feature update cycle that are useless to me and kinda clog up my experience. But again, highly subjective. Then there is the issue wiht using GCC on the command prompt and it running much slower than it originally did in Windows 7.

Outside of these little issues I run into, everything seems to be ok with the OS itself. All of my machines have it installed with the exception of my Work PC as I need an environment with no frills, no bloat, and more importantly, no breakage! so I run Win7 in a VM.
 

Erel

Administrator
Staff member
Licensed User
I switched to Windows 10 several months ago and I'm very satisfied. I did disable auto updates as I don't like the PC restarting itself unexpectedly.
From my experience both Windows 7 and Windows 10 are reliable and can run months without any severe issue (BSOD).
 

Syd Wright

Active Member
Licensed User
I switched to Windows 10 several months ago and I'm very satisfied. I did disable auto updates as I don't like the PC restarting itself unexpectedly.
From my experience both Windows 7 and Windows 10 are reliable and can run months without any severe issue (BSOD).
That is good to know, but it doesn't answer my question, especially in view of the fact that the market share of Google O.S. is growing rapidly.
Also, the reliability of Windows is not in question, however the ongoing world wide concerns about privacy violations and safety are.
 

NJDude

Expert
Licensed User
I switched to Windows 10 several months ago and I'm very satisfied. I did disable auto updates as I don't like the PC restarting itself unexpectedly.
From my experience both Windows 7 and Windows 10 are reliable and can run months without any severe issue (BSOD).
Depending on what version you have (hopefully you are up to date), you can actually control how the patches are applied so those 'unexpected' reboots are a thing of the past. You mentioned BSOD, what's that? do we still have those in Windows 10? I haven't had one in years, and I'm not kidding.
 

NJDude

Expert
Licensed User
That is good to know, but it doesn't answer my question, especially in view of the fact that the market share of Google O.S. is growing rapidly.
Also, the reliability of Windows is not in question, however the ongoing world wide concerns about privacy violations and safety are.
Google OS (I'm assuming Android) is mainly for 'smartphones' and other small devices and in no way shape or form would take over or reach the level of Windows, and if you are concerned about privacy then better reconsider using anything Google since you have no idea what 'features' they have.
 

sorex

Expert
Licensed User
then better reconsider using anything Google since you have no idea what 'features' they have.
my colleague mentioned some nice 'feature' last week.
he received a mail from Google with all the physical locations he went to the past year including names of shops, restaurants etc.
according to him all tracked without him given permission to do so.
 

NJDude

Expert
Licensed User
my colleague mentioned some nice 'feature' last week.
he received a mail from Google with all the physical locations he went to the past year including names of shops, restaurants etc.
according to him all tracked without him given permission to do so.
Yup, in fact, that 'feature' is called Google Dashboard, no one knows it existed, it's basically the story of your life, every site you've visited, YouTube Video you've watch etc etc, one thing Microsoft doesn't do is to have options to 'track' enabled by default (maybe just a few) but with Google EVERTYHING is an Opt-Out instead of Opt-In.
 

andymc

Well-Known Member
Licensed User
One options might be to use a VM running windows 10 on Azure or AWS. You'll only pay for it while it's running. I've set one up so I can do B4A coding during my lunch hours at work, as I'm not allowed to install B4A on my work PC. It will only cost me a few pounds a month to run.
 

aeric

Active Member
Licensed User
 

themr23

Member
Licensed User
keep in mind that the chrome books are far from what you tend to do/use with a regular desktop or laptop.

in our case it's mainly using a remote desktop client and that gave us already some misery also thanks to buggy ChromeOS updates that get silently pushed out.

It doesn't run regular windows programs so if your favourite tool doesn't exist as an Chrome/Adroid app you can forget about it.

it's a good toy for people who just read some email and surf around the web a bit but if you go beyond that you better look out for a cheap laptop which gives you more freedom.
Chrome Apps going away this year.
 

Ferdari

Member
Licensed User
I feel virtually more safe using Windows 10 than using any Google software, when im using some Google(Chrome, CloudSync) software on Windows, i see on Admin manager they install lots of programs and services, always running on background(CrashHandler1.exe, CrashHandler2.exe GoogleUpdater.exe), what that programs are doing?? why if you close one it reopens magically?, what data are they gathering?? can you disable that? NO, at least Microsoft asks what data they can take and if you want to share data.

Google is a Monster, and his principal business is Knowing you.
 

AnandGupta

Well-Known Member
Licensed User
@Syd Wright don't be afraid of Win10.

I am using Win10 both 32 bit and 64 bit at office and home. I do not face any problem even in running my 16 bits software, normally in 32 bit and with dosbox in 64 bit.
So rest assured that no harm will come in developing VB6 in Win10.

As for privacy and other no-related issues, there are various tools and settings available to tweak as per your need. Just let Google help you here. And yes, as Erel said, you can set update manually too.

Regards,

Anand
 
Top