Android Question RCS messaging question

InfiniteImp

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Licensed User
Hi, I have an app written in B4A that sends out SMS messages and processes responses. Will this app be affected by Google's new RCS messaging or do the two standards work indpendently?

I use PhoneSms.Send and sendMultipartTextMessage for outgoing messages and I intercept incoming messages with SmsInterceptor.

Thanks.
 

JohnC

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Licensed User
From what I understand, the new RCS feature is a new feature in the Google "Messages" app. "Messages" is Google's own SMS app and is the default/main sms app on Google devices like nexus and pixels phones. Owners of non-google phones can install Messages on their device, making the Messages app their new default/main sms app (their original SMS app will then no longer function when google messages is installed).

From what I also understand, Google was tired of waiting around for all the carriers to implement RCS, so google instead implemented it using its own network. So, for at least the time being, a user can only get the new RCS feature by installing google's own Messages app. But, in the future when carriers start to implement RCS in their own networks, then you won't need Messages to get this feature.

And from what I also understand, if your app is available in the playstore, then in order for your app to "send" SMS messages, it needs to be the user's default SMS app (meaning that it is used for ALL sms communications). See this link for more info on this new rule: https://www.b4x.com/android/forum/threads/sms-and-call_log-permissions-are-no-longer-available.98100/.

So, if your app is the devices default/main sms app, then that would mean google's messages app is NOT installed (because both applications can not be the default sms app at the same time), so it will not effect your apps operation as long as your app is the main/default sms app.

But, if a user installs Google's Messages app (to get the RCS feature), then it will be the new main/default sms app, and since your app will no longer be the default sms app, your app will no longer work.
 
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InfiniteImp

Member
Licensed User
So, if your app is the devices default/main sms app, then that would mean google's messages app is NOT installed (because both applications can not be the default sms app at the same time), so it will not effect your apps operation as long as your app is the main/default sms app.

But, if a user installs Google's Messages app (to get the RCS feature), then it will be the new main/default sms app, and since your app will no longer be the default sms app, your app will no longer work.
Thanks for that. The app I wrote is not available in the store, and it is also not the main messaging app. It is an app we needed at work to send automated messages to clients and to process responses. It is exists alongside the default messaging app, whatever app came with the Galaxy S6. The default app is not being used, however, as my app is basically the only thing that the phone is used for. It is not physically used by people.

So, given that, it is safe to conclude the functionality of my app will not be interrupted by the RCS standard?
 

JohnC

Well-Known Member
Licensed User
I would say at this time it should not be effected. But I can not promise it won't be in the future when your carrier implements RCS in their network...

Initially, I'm thinking you are probably still safe because even when they implement RCS, they would probably maintain legacy SMS support for many more years and thus the API your phone uses for "legacy" SMS would still work. But, if you upgrade/replace your phone and the new phone is only designed to use RCS, then all bets are off.
 
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