Other It's time to grow

LucaMs

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Anyway, VB (and B4X) is too simple, it is for children; yet I'm going crazy with a piece of code.

I'm probably 3 years old again 😄
 

junglejet

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B4X is not really Basic, in a similar way that VB .Net is not really Basic (and B4X is also very different than VB .Net).
I also see that you are a member since 2009 so I'm not sure that it is just for kids :)
Anyway, there is no point in arguing about it. I'm of course familiar with Basic reputation and this is one of the reasons that Basic4android became B4A and the programming language is named B4X.
I am 61 and I am just sharing the perceptions of 40 or so years IT work and constantly talking to young people who believe they are very smart and hip. Not more than that. You can see that all these super ultra smart people jump onto 2 or 3 new languages a year, most of them you will never here of again. Basic was originally developed as an interpreter, compared to the compilers like Fortran and Cobol at the time. About the same perception is true for Python, although it is not justified at all. But these people create opinons.

Yes, I admit I learned Fortran and ran programs with punched cards. Subroutines were stacks of punched cards that we exchanged, and hopefully not mixed up and put into the right place of stack.
 

junglejet

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I don't know where you got that from but it's totally wrong.

it was invented for those who didn't want to write programs in 100% assembler and it's just a human readable/understandible way of programming
which is the same as any languaguage that is not assembler.

a lot of professional programs where written in basic back then (70s & 80s) and if required you mixed it with assembler parts for speed reasons.

in case of the .NET platform it doesn't matter if you write in VB or C# as it will compile to nearly the exact same .NET thing.

I think a lot of these 'PROs' still think that everything basic related is slow and is using GOTOs. It advanced over the years aswell.

Look at freeBASIC it's BASIC so it's bad? well, it does a straight optimized convertion to C and you can even add your inline assembler routines.
in the end the exe is just as fast as if you wrote it in C. The end result counts, not?
This is the rational perception and I agree. But when you run a technology business you have to take care of your hip customers and the coolness factor. A Tesla battery car with 5 gauges and a small monitor instead of 1 big monitor is just uncool. Though I am not sure this single monitor approach is really convenient for the customer. Actually I hate it. But it is cool.
 

rbghongade

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Hi,
This debate about BASIC has been going for decades! In my opinion B4X gets the job done, meets the customer specs, is highly reliable (and sweet)! There is no other framework which let's the designer start with sensor- microcontroller interface and go all the way up to user interface (multiple platforms)using almost same coding language! (Python is a near competitor but again not as elegant as B4X). This is my personal opinion and after 4 major projects , I can think about no other platform.
 

Winni

Member
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When you've observed the development and evolution of BASIC dialects over the last 40 years or so (which I have), then you will regard Python as basically (pun intended) just another BASIC dialect.

dBase/Clipper/Xbase++ also have a lot of similarities with modern BASIC dialects like (the now open-sourced) BlitzMax, for example.

There are three programming languages that managed to pay for my bills in my career:
PowerBASIC
Turbo Pascal
Xbase++

Python became a utility language for smaller tasks and for what is now called "dev ops" work.

There are other languages that I've learned, but never really used in production environments (C++, C#, Visual Basic 5, COBOL, 6502 Assembler) - I think C++, C# and even COBOL qualify as so-called "professional" languages. Strangely enough, they were never really relevant in my professional career.

So at the end of the day, it's all nonsense. Use whatever lets you get a professional job done. You don't need Makita tools if the products from Metabo let you do the same thing, but for some reason you can handle them better. Programming languages are just tools. You get paid for the result, not for using a certain tool.

All the best,
W.
 

LucaMs

Expert
Licensed User
When you've observed the development and evolution of BASIC dialects over the last 40 years or so (which I have), then you will regard Python as basically (pun intended) just another BASIC dialect.

dBase/Clipper/Xbase++ also have a lot of similarities with modern BASIC dialects like (the now open-sourced) BlitzMax, for example.

There are three programming languages that managed to pay for my bills in my career:
PowerBASIC
Turbo Pascal
Xbase++

Python became a utility language for smaller tasks and for what is now called "dev ops" work.

There are other languages that I've learned, but never really used in production environments (C++, C#, Visual Basic 5, COBOL, 6502 Assembler) - I think C++, C# and even COBOL qualify as so-called "professional" languages. Strangely enough, they were never really relevant in my professional career.

So at the end of the day, it's all nonsense. Use whatever lets you get a professional job done. You don't need Makita tools if the products from Metabo let you do the same thing, but for some reason you can handle them better. Programming languages are just tools. You get paid for the result, not for using a certain tool.

All the best,
W.
It depends on whether you are a freelancer or an employee. As an employee you must know and use the tools and languages of the company you work for (I was forced to learn and use RPGLE, unknown to many here, I suppose); as a freelancer who produces and sells your own sw, without sources, obviously you should use the language that allows you to reach your goal in the shortest time possible (you could also be a different type of freelancer and need to know the languages currently most popular).

In any case... B4X is and will be the solution ;)
 

AnandGupta

Well-Known Member
Licensed User
Programming languages are just tools. You get paid for the result, not for using a certain tool.
Agree++.

I use different tools do develop diverse applications, from small Overlap Wallpaper to bigger Accounting Software.
But yes some clients do ask 'what software I am using to develop' and I reply C++. Period. No further question from them. They are happy, I am happy.
For Android just say Java.

Look these clients are never going to develop any application. It is just their satisfaction psychology. But they will always ask for better and faster result.
So make them happy and keep using the tools which make you happy by giving faster and better results.

Regards,

Anand
 

Sergio Castellari

Active Member
Licensed User
Thank you very much Erel !!! It is great news! I am a teacher and I have been using it for several years, now I will be able to disseminate b4a at the National University of Mar del Plata, Argentina.

Muchas gracias Erel!!!. Es una gran noticia!!. Soy docente y hace varios años que lo utilizo, ahora voy a poder divulgar b4a en la Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Argentina.
Hola @geminw !!!
Yo tambien soy docente (en secundario) y ademas Analista de Sistemas (que es de lo que realmente vivo) desarrollando sistemas de Gestion Comercial!
Abrazos y buena suerte con la idea!
Sergio Castellari
 

LucaMs

Expert
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[Is there a thread for suggestions on how to help B4X become "the most used tool to develop everything"? Maybe, but I can not find it, now]

[What I am about to write has already been suggested / asked but I am writing it anyway because I think it may be important].

A thread (or better a forum) with project templates - better if B4X-XUI.

It would be very useful for both beginners and experts.
 

Jorge M A

Active Member
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project templates - better if B4X-XUI.
I think there's a great advance of the talented @Peter Simpson here:
 

LucaMs

Expert
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I think there's a great advance of the talented @Peter Simpson here:
It looks nice and useful (just "looks" because I haven't tried it yet).

It's a pity that:

1 - from the title of the thread it is not clear that it could be what I meant, that is a "container for public project templates";

2 - I see that only a couple of members have published their own templates.
 
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